Miss Has Class

blueguen:

catssecretstash:

Game of Cats

omg

owlturdcomix:

But you can’t hide.

image

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I’m trying. Like, a lot. 

You don’t want to know how big my marking pile still is.

betterbooktitles:

Another important message from @DanWilbur

professional-youtube-watcher:

The continuing struggle of having Tony Abbott as PM

theimprobablefiction:

fuckyeahgreatplays:

FiveThirtyEight was surprised to find, via computer analysis, that Romeo and Juliet speak less to each other than to other characters.

I’m blaming Romeo for this lack of communication. Juliet speaks 155 lines to him, and he speaks only 101 to her. His reticence toward Juliet is particularly inexcusable when you consider that Romeo spends more time talking than anyone else in the play. (He spends only one-sixth of his time in conversation with the supposed love of his life.)
The plays with the most connected lovers seem to be the ones with strong women: “The Taming of the Shrew’s” fiery Katharina, “Macbeth’s” homicidal Lady Macbeth, “The Merchant of Venice’s” brilliant Portia, and “Antony and Cleopatra’s” seductive and defiant Cleopatra. In general, Shakespeare’s female lovers lavish a larger share of their lines on their men than the men do on them. This is true not just of “Romeo and Juliet,” but of “Macbeth,” “The Taming of the Shrew” and all four couples in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The only real exceptions, tellingly, occur in the plays where the women pose as men: “Twelfth Night” and “The Merchant of Venice.” (Antony and Cleopatra spend roughly equal shares of lines on each other.)

The whole article is a fascinating read. There’s even an nifty set of interactive graphs. 

Save for future reference/reading. I love analysis like this!

theimprobablefiction:

fuckyeahgreatplays:

FiveThirtyEight was surprised to find, via computer analysis, that Romeo and Juliet speak less to each other than to other characters.

I’m blaming Romeo for this lack of communication. Juliet speaks 155 lines to him, and he speaks only 101 to her. His reticence toward Juliet is particularly inexcusable when you consider that Romeo spends more time talking than anyone else in the play. (He spends only one-sixth of his time in conversation with the supposed love of his life.)

The plays with the most connected lovers seem to be the ones with strong women: “The Taming of the Shrew’s” fiery Katharina, “Macbeth’s” homicidal Lady Macbeth, “The Merchant of Venice’s” brilliant Portia, and “Antony and Cleopatra’s” seductive and defiant Cleopatra. In general, Shakespeare’s female lovers lavish a larger share of their lines on their men than the men do on them. This is true not just of “Romeo and Juliet,” but of “Macbeth,” “The Taming of the Shrew” and all four couples in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The only real exceptions, tellingly, occur in the plays where the women pose as men: “Twelfth Night” and “The Merchant of Venice.” (Antony and Cleopatra spend roughly equal shares of lines on each other.)

The whole article is a fascinating read. There’s even an nifty set of interactive graphs.

Save for future reference/reading. I love analysis like this!

i forget that princes don’t have tails
until they kick at the water i am trying to make their home.

i forget that sailors drink no salt
until their bodies shrivel and wrinkle in the sea.

i forget that that captains must, too, breathe air
until my kisses do nothing to warm their lips.

i forget that i am not meant to care for them
until my sisters congratulate me on their death.

i forget that lovers can drown as well as enemies
until, one by one, they go limp in my arms.

i forget that i cannot cry
until it is all i cannot do to mourn.

i forget i am a monster
because what good would remembering do?

mermaid’s lament" - r. c. e. (via thepurposeismypenis)

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

HELLO FRIEND

EVEN THOUGH YOU ARE NOT CAT

YOU ARE STILL GOOD

YES

HERE

WHEN HUMANS THINK YOU ARE GOOD THEY DO THIS

AND I THINK YOU ARE GOOD

SO

(PET PET PET)